Wednesday, 5 August 2020

A Basic Silk Shading Tutorial . . . .

Split stitch

First stitch, up and over split stitch at the very top tip

Long and short at tip, which is swivelled at the base

Long and short edge, or rather longer and shorter

First row of long and short (longer and shorter). When taking the needle down over the split stitch, keep the stitches very close and tight together.  This keeps a sharp clean edge.

First row, over split stitch with the angle of stitch moving around the leaf shape.  Whilst working the first row, be mindful of maintaining the angle of stitch.

Shading - bringing the needle up within the first row, and shading towards the middle

Bring the needle up in various positions within the first row for a softer shaded effect

Needle or stitch position of second row, or shading

Shading towards the centre of the leaf

Shading with more colour - keep the blends compatible

Showing various needle position for shading

More shading and needle positioning

More needle positioning of shading, illustrating the various positions the stitches can be placed for effective shading

Third row, or further shading

First half of leaf shaded

Second half of leaf, long and short first row

Shading from first row

More shading

Almost complete

Centre vein.  The whole leaf is roughly an inch square.

Wednesday, 9 January 2019

Monday, 9 January 2017

Further shading



Working one colour into another is not as simple as stopping one colour, and then starting the next.  When I shade through colours, I would possibly have four different colours/needles working together at the same time, but I would lessen the first colour, increase the second and third, and introduce a forth, before finishing the first, and then repeat . . . 

If one colour is worked, then stopped, then the next and stopped, and so on, the shading will be striped throughout, rather than softly and gradually shaded throughout.

Blending tones of colour, the angle and length of stitch need to be considered also, especially when working around a curve.

Monday, 24 October 2016

Shelley Rhodes workshop in Northumberland

Over this last weekend, I have been fortunate enough to join in on a Shelley Rhodes weekend at Gallery 45, in Felton, Northumberland, with the north east textile group - Fusion.
It was lovely to be able to create if only for a weekend, using various mixed media textile art techniques, which are generally quicker than traditional embroidery techniques.

So my fascination with textile art begins to grow, whilst most of my working life is dedicated to traditional embroidery.

Here is one of my creations based on edges.